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About Crown

 

The Crown boasts its own colourful historical connections. It is situated just up from the birth place of Cat Stevens, Shaftesbury Avenue. This major London road, which is considered to be at the heat of London's West End theatre district, was also featured in the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows film, as well as being referenced to in the Dire Straits song ‘Wild West End’. The Pub is located on the Seven Dials on Monmouth street. It is the perfect location for exploring Covent Garden, Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Street, as well as being a ten minute walk from Trafalgar Square and just five more minutes on to Parliament Square or Buckingham Palace. For all those seeking some theatrical entertainment, the Cambridge theatre is on the doorstep of the Crown. Its ever changing roster of big names in the lead roles means you may even be lucky enough to bump into one of these stars at the Pub! The original layout of the Seven Dials area was designed by Thomas Neale in the early 1690s. The original plan had six roads converging, although this was later increased to seven. The sundial pillar was built with only six faces, however, probably because of the original design. This number of roads was chosen in order to maximise the number of houses that could be built on the site. Following the successful development of the fashionable Covent Garden Piazza area nearby, Neale aimed for the Seven Dials site to be popular with well-off residents. This was not to be, however, and the area gradually deteriorated.At one stage, each of the seven apexes facing the column housed a pub. By the nineteenth century, Seven Dials had become one of the most notorious slums in London, being part of the rookery of St Giles. The area was described colourfully by Charles Dickens in his collection Sketches by Boz, which includes the quote: “ The stranger who finds himself in the Dials for the first time...at the entrance of Seven obscure passages, uncertain which to take, will see enough around him to keep his curiosity awake for no inconsiderable time... ”